up against lowstacks and other stuff

Svcmgr has in his blog posted a topic that i do find important! I do believe it’s important to play to win and not to loose, there is a big difference between those two styles of strategy. It is also important to try and take out the lowstacks at the table as soon as possible with any 2 cards but there’s one aspect that’s not mentioned anywhere and you all recognice it, you all been there! It’s when you feel in all of your essence from the hairroots down to the toenails how wrong that hand feels, no matter what it is! You simply know that the hand will bust!

Even after long thoughtful consideration no matter if it is the rockets, any 2 cards, how good the potodds or any other odds are or how high stack you’ve got, you just know deep inside this hand will bust!

In that case i will fold my hand! And don’t come here and say the potodds or your obligation as highstacked dictates that you should call in order to get them out, yes you should i agree but if it feels utterly wrong then fold! Next any 2 cards could feel the other way!

Everyone that knows me know that i never ever have preached the-follow-your-gutfeelingstrategy and that i everytime anyone bust me nags about how stupid i think they played (only if i’m busted with a lesser hand than i had, i’m not a poor looser) but still the gutfeeling are a force wich cannot be ignored so wherever you see or however you look at it it’s gonna be there for people (me) to get upset by!

How I’m doing in poker?

Well during November i did really good, played the 6-seater $10 sitngoes and often with the result, played 3 – won 2 and made 1 second! hehe

But now? I have had a very long streak of bad luck when i have been carddead the whole december and up until this day. It changes slowly to the better but i can say this with honesty if i get quads first hand i just know i’m gonna bust within an hour and a half! Had it 2 games in a row and was in both games totally carddead almost for 2 hours into the game, didn’t even play my bbs due to getting raised and sitting with q 2, k 3 or 7 2 off. That was the cards i got! And so has it been for more than a month. Looking at the stats shows that i looked at 7% of the flops for 2 hours and won 1% of them. Hmmmm! The stats speaks for itself here. And when i finally got a hand like pp jacks or queens i get busted against ace 5 off and a two pair!

Getting concerned and considering now that i might have fallen back into some of the bad habits i used to have playing? (That would mean that i haven’t made any progress or learned anything past year, can it really be so?) Either if it is not having fun and playing routinely or if the bad streaks makes me play overly tight? But looking at the cards i folded and what came up on the board dictates that i folded correctly and would have been busted more quickly if i played them. So overly tight it can’t be! For the not-having-that-fun playing? Well it isn’t fun loosing or bubble out constantly over a long period of time so can’t argue with that!

Well the christmas week was the first time since late november i actually did see progress when i came in second in a sitngo! I bubbled out in the ofc-buyin but i played better, got better cards and had more fun than i had for a long time! Was in skype taunting Pinkdog when i had more chips than he had and he taunted me about how he was right behind me, coming to get my chips. nonono For a long time there i managed to keep ahead of him until i got pp qs in my sb and i raised the bb (who was way chipleader over me) He reraised and i believed he was trying to steal so i went allin just to find myself up against his rockets, they held and out i went on my ass! That was a very nice hand and win for him!

Read a question on the topic how to overcome bad-beats and bad streaks and the answer is: Practice, practice, practice and patience, patience, patience! Play one game per day for practice of playing/reading people and no-more. The no-more is the practice of learning patience! Know that everyone have these moments (some for short periods and others longer periods of time) but everyone experiences them, everyone feels the unfairness of being outdrawn hand after hand!

As a friend of mine tells me everytime i bitch about my bad luck (and this brings me back to the reality every time i hear it)

-Well you can’t in reality expect to win them all!

(boy do i feel stupid when i’m getting told that!)

blushingbetty

But i still have to struggle and fight! Nothing comes easy in this game and it shouldn’t either!

Play smart, fair and have lots of fun!

Big Hugs

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4 Responses to “up against lowstacks and other stuff”

  1. PinkDog Says:

    I found this on Darla’s poker playground and sent it to a few of my friends that seem to be ruuning poorly,

    Running Bad
    Chris Ferguson
    January 3rd 2008

    In 1964, Supreme Court Justice Potter Stewart tried to define what may or may not be considered obscene under US law. In the end, he determined that no definition existed, but that when it comes to obscenity, “I know it when I see it.”

    The same holds true when you’re talking about running badly at the poker table. You may not be able to identify what’s going wrong, but you know its happening. As far as I’m concerned, there’s no single definition or criteria for “running bad” because it means something different to everyone. For some players, it’s posting 10 or 12 losing sessions in a row. For others, it’s losing a dozen coin-flips during a single session. “Running badly” depends on the individual and on the metrics they’re using to judge their performance.

    Whatever the definition is, the fact remains that everyone runs bad at one time or another. What separates successful players from those who go bust is how they handle themselves and their bankrolls when their cards go dead. For me, running bad doesn’t mean having a few losing nights or taking a few bad beats over the course of a session. That’s variance and it’s an inevitable part of the game. In my mind, running bad is something bigger that happens over the long term.

    If you’re not sure whether you’re really running bad or not, start by stepping back and analyzing your results over a statistically significant timeframe. If you see a consistent pattern of losing sessions over a matter of weeks or months, then it’s likely that you’re having some real problems with your game. The key to getting back on track is figure out what’s actually going wrong.

    For many players, running badly is a vicious circle; they suffer a few losing sessions and begin to tilt, which leads them to alter their playing styles in order to change things up. Soon, they do actually start playing badly, which leads to more losing sessions, and a continuation of their downward spiral. They lose because they’re running badly and they’re running badly because they’re losing.

    If you look at your game and believe that you’re actually playing well but are just getting unlucky, then maybe you are. Aces get cracked by lower pairs. Sets get beaten by flushes, and hands get drowned on the river more often than you might think. My advice in these situations is to walk away from the game for a while. Take a break, regroup, and come back when you’re mentally refreshed and are ready to start playing again. Don’t, however, begin changing your game to compensate for bad luck. Focus on the fundamentals, look for good starting hands, and try to play the most solid poker you can. In time, your luck will change.

    Whatever you do, however, don’t try to step up in levels in order to try and recoup your losses. I’ve seen many players go bust at times like these because they’re too focused on trying to rebuild their bankrolls by gambling rather than by playing smart poker and moving down to play at a lower level. Think about it; if you’ve been losing, chances are that you’re playing on a smaller bankroll than normal, which means that you’ll be risking a higher percentage of your remaining funds by playing at higher stakes. With a smaller cushion behind you and more of your bankroll at risk, it doesn’t take long for things to go from bad to worse and for you to lose everything you had left.

    On the other hand, by moving down a level or two, you’ll be risking less in the short term while you try to rebuild your bankroll. Sure, the pots you win may not be as big as those you win at higher levels, but weighed against the odds of going broke, it’s a trade-off I’m willing to make. What’s more, by moving down, I may only have to play at a lower level for a month or two to recover my losses whereas if I go broke after moving up, it could take me a year or more until I’ve recovered. That’s a pretty persuasive argument if you really value your time.

    While I can’t tell you whether you’re really running badly or not, I can tell you that your mental state does impact your game. If you’re feeling good, chances are you’ll play well and, if you’re not, chances are you won’t. Rough patches are part of the game and learning how to handle short-term adversity without losing your confidence or your bankroll will make you a better player in the long run.

  2. netsson Says:

    i indeed agree on this… i stepped down in buyins from my regular level and keep my style of playing. hell yeah i go on tilt sometimes but who doesn’t? But for me it is really about being totally carddead and now i’m trying to compensate that and keeping my mental state on the same level with the consolidation that it will change. It’s not about my gaming, conspiracy or anything else but being damn unlucky.

    Soooo nice to have you commenting my posts…. keep it coming
    hugs

  3. svcmgr Says:

    Netty,
    Two things
    1. I totally agree with the gut feeling thing. Sometimes, no matter what the cards, you have this bad feeling tugging at you about the hand. I to, in that case would fold.
    2. You must be getting back. You sure beat my ass the other day. Maybe, the competion between us helps you in some way cause when we have a side bet, you really want to kick my ass. Lol
    We will keep them up. I am 0 for 2 with you so I have to have a chance to get back.
    See ya soon. I hope you’re ready!

  4. netsson Says:

    SvcMgr hon! You’re absolutely right, I really, reeeeaally want to woooop your behind and the sidebet is strangely enough more challenging than the tour itself! So to boost up the mental will to win i usually set up a sidecompetition at home just for myself to beat certain ppl who reg for the tournament. That then becomes one of the goals i do set up and i have more fun that way.

    Rofl beside that to tell me i can’t do a certain something is the best way to make me actually achieve it. Geee do i have some issues to address here with the need to prove myself.

    And the best way to make me screw something up is opposite to tell me how simple things are and how easily i can win! Then i really don’t make the effort to win! Soo hon mock away and your bankroll will be mine muahahaha

    No i really think it’s important to set up goals and strategies on how to achieve these goals

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